On-the-spot pictures for strangers illustrates Anthony Causi’s generosity

Lahoma Whitelow

Anthony J. Causi, the beloved sports photographer who lost his month-long battle with the novel coronavirus Sunday night at the age of 48, was known for illuminating more than the pages of The Post’s sports section with his eye-catching images. He will also be remembered for his generosity to everyday […]


Anthony J. Causi, the beloved sports photographer who lost his month-long battle with the novel coronavirus Sunday night at the age of 48, was known for illuminating more than the pages of The Post’s sports section with his eye-catching images.

He will also be remembered for his generosity to everyday people. One Massachusetts couple, in particular, will never forget him.

It was Dec. 18, 2010, and Justin Quinlan had just successfully proposed to his future wife, Lindsay, in Central Park. Moments later, Causi came walking over, apologized for interrupting them and introduced himself. From a distance, he had noticed Quinlan getting down on one knee and stopped what he was doing to catch the moment.

“I would love to get your information and I’ll get the pictures sent over to you,” he told them.

“You’re kind of in shock, like ‘Oh my God, that’s amazing you got a picture of that,’ ” Quinlan said. “Obviously we looked into him a little bit and kind of see he was this big-deal sports photographer. Of all the people that happened to be there, and for him to do that and send it to us, is pretty amazing.

“We were pretty thrilled to have it.”

The next day, Lindsay received the photos.

“Lots of luck!” Causi wrote in an email. “Enjoy the photos!”

The couple used one of the photos, which Quinlan called a “random act of a kindness,” as the art on the save-the-date notice for their wedding and it still hangs in their home to this day.

Quinlan came across the tragic news Sunday night on Twitter, after ESPN’s Chris Mortensen retweeted a Post story about Causi’s death. He responded to a touching column by The Post’s Mike Vaccaro remembering Causi with his memory and included the photo of that day in Central Park.

“I read how he did the same exact thing for thousands of people [that he did for us]. I thought it was kind of an appropriate thing to respond to and share,” he said. “It was the first time I ever put something on Twitter, to be honest.

“We felt terrible about it. It kind of brought us back, kind of remembering what a nice great thing it was for him to do that for us.”

 Editor’s note: A GoFundMe account has been set up for the Causi family in wake of Anthony’s passing. Please find it here



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